Tuesday, March 14, 2006

Edward Casaubon

So that we should know what he looks like:
His manners, she thought, were very dignified; the set of his iron-gray hair and his deep eye-sockets made him resemble the portrait of Locke. He had the spare form and the pale complexion which became a student; as different as possible from the blooming Englishman of the red-whiskered type represented by Sir James Chettam.


From The Victorian Web:

The "portrait of Locke" is most likely to be Kneller's of 1698, of which at least fourteen different engravings exist; see Freeman O'Donoghue, Catalogue of Engraved British Portraits Preserved in the Department of Prints and Drawings in the British Museum (London: Trustees of the British Museum, 1912), III, 79-81. Dorothea might have seen the version by R. Graves (no. 13 in O'Donoghue) which appeared as the frontispiece to Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (London: J. F. Dove, 1828). The Leweses owned a copy of this edition; see Baker, The George Eliot-George Henry Lewes Library, #1311.


Not exactly my type. (I think the words paint a prettier picture than does the portrait in question.)

6 Comments:

Anonymous martha said...

Oh, thanks for this! I love visual aids. I'm actually feeling a little bit sorry for Casaubon, and more than a little sorry for Dorothea. It's a train wreck waiting to happen.

9:24 PM  
Blogger kimbofo said...

Poor old Casaubon. I actually feel sorry for the poor sod!

3:02 PM  
Blogger Ella said...

Yikes. Nice to see the hairy moles are missing, though.

11:17 AM  
Blogger Kenneth said...

I have found on reading Middlemarch that Edward Casaubon is a "second self"! The rows of dustgathering notebooks, the chapters begun but never finished to my own version of "the Key to all mythologies", the ambages of note-making etc.

I hope to dedicate my next parergon, (or should that be tractate?)

IN MEMORIAM EDWARDI CASAUBON
1785-1830

I would be exceedingly obliged if any of you Middlemarch afficionados could furnish me with a correct floruit for the Revd. Casaubon.

I should point out that I have not decoyed any young Dorothea Brooke into the Purgatory of a modern Lowick Grange.

3:29 AM  
Blogger Kenneth said...

I have found on reading Middlemarch that Edward Casaubon is a "second self"! The rows of dustgathering notebooks, the chapters begun but never finished to my own version of "the Key to all mythologies", the ambages of note-making etc.

I hope to dedicate my next parergon, (or should that be tractate?)

IN MEMORIAM EDWARDI CASAUBON
1785-1830

I would be exceedingly obliged if any of you Middlemarch afficionados could furnish me with a correct floruit for the Revd. Casaubon.

I should point out that I have not decoyed any young Dorothea Brooke into the Purgatory of a modern Lowick Grange.

3:30 AM  
Anonymous Julia said...

I would highly recommend (although not until finishing the book) the BBC TV series. The casting was pretty good - I think someone already referred to the the delicious Rufus Sewell facilitating early sympathy for Ladislaw - but Patrick Malahide as Casaubon is amazing, just right.

2:08 AM  

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